Canadian Army Aviation Forum





Comments:
John,

Our thanks for your interest in the website and your enlightening account about Perkins. We will post your comments in our Forum Section so that others will be aware of Perkins' exploits and your interest in the website.

Vic Coroy, Chairman, Editorial Board


Added: May 4, 2018
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address




Comments:
Gents:

A most interesting web site where I have just spent an hour when I should have been working in the garden! I recognized a lot of names and faces, a couple of whom I did not know had died.

Having just read a LCol McIvity's excellent WW 2 history of the LdSH, Maj Perkins' photo, but no history, struck me as perhaps an oversight. He won a DSO as a Lt at the Moro crossing in 1944; bounced the river and held a bridgehead with his recce tp until reinforced by a coy of the Westminster Regiment. Perkins stayed in the bridgehead with the Westies (the coy comd won the VC) to fight off the inevitable counterattack(s) thus enabling the rest of the 5th Div to cross the next day and carry on toward Rome.

Thank you for your considerable efforts to honour these men and to educate our woefully ignorant fellow Canadians on our rich military history.

John Selkirk, LCol (ret'd) Cdn Gds/RCR/Brock Rif


Added: May 4, 2018
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address




Comments:
Hi George,

Our thanks for your offer to provide a 450 Sqn account about the 10 year anniversary ceremonies at the Iroquois Lock near Cornwall and the follow on trip to Montreal. Your recollection of the Sqn's activities would be most welcome on the website. We suggest that you provide an email message with narrative and photo attachments. It would be helpful if the narrative is in MS Word and the photos are in a .jpg format. The photos can be integrated with the text or sent separately. Our very professional webmaster can format the final submission before posting.

We will review the submission and if editing is required we will return the edited version for your review before posting the complete submission. We want the originator to have the final say in what is posted on the website.

We look forward to receiving your submission and our thanks for your interest in our website.

Cheers,

Vic

Chairman
Editorial Board
Canadian Army Aviation Website


Added: April 30, 2018
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
Gentlemen,

I read with interest and pleasure Joe`s account of 403 Sqn in its early days. A mission he mentioned, the support by 403 Squadron of the St Lawrence Seaway 10 year anniversary ceremonies at the Iroquois Lock near Cornwall, Ontario, brought back some great memories of 450 Squadron`s involvement in the day`s activities and the part played by a very young and somewhat naive Captain Zvanitajs, who as the Canadian Mission Commander was responsible for all Canadian Army Aviation assets during the visit of President Nixon (sorry Joe, not Johnson) to the locks and follow on trip to Man and His World in Montreal.

This was a very interesting and complicated operation involving, 403 and 450 Squadrons, the Coast guard, Presidential Flight with Marine 1 and 2 and a Marine, Jolly Green Giant for the American Press and hangers on. I also learned a bit about politics and egos when the CO of 403 Squadron advised the Americans that he would be assuming command of the Canadian part of the mission, only to be told, politely but firmly that the Mission Commander (me) had been approved at the highest level and they had complete confidence in my ability to coordinate the Canadian activity and asked that 403 Squadron carry on with the very important part of the operation it had been assigned, without any last minute changes. Followed shortly after by a very short and somewhat cool conversation with the CO 403 about my real place in the military pecking order.

I think it would make for an interesting story and I would like to forward a submission on my recollections of the day, with some pictures. I would like your advice on the best way to do this. Through the Army Aviation Website, an e-mail with attachments, which you can edit or any other way you may suggest.

Hope you are all staying healthy and enjoying the highly overrrated Golden Age in your lives.

Sincerely,

George


Added: April 30, 2018
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address




Comments:
The Lieutenant Gordon Shellard Caper

For many years a story was told and retold in Air OP, army pilot and gunner circles about a low flying incident involving Gordie Shellard, an Air OP pilot with 2 Air OP Flight in Camp Shilo. (The story has Gordie in the rank of Lt, he is listed as having left the military as a Capt). There are several versions that have been related over a drink in the Mess and elsewhere. Unfortunately, those directly involved are no longer with us and have long departed for the big hangar in the sky. The army aviation website is trying to track down what actually happened. In doing so, we contacted Knobby Clark whom we thought would be the right vintage and closer to the story than anyone else we could name. Here is Knobby’s version:

“I was at the RCSA in Shilo as an instructor from the summer of 1952 to Nov 1953. Col AJB Bailey was Commandant of the school and Capt Bob Hemingson was his adjutant. One summer day, likely the summer of 1953 but possibly the summer of 1952, Col Bailey and Capt Hemingson were out on the ranges checking on range exercises.

Lt Gordie Shellard was in the air in an Auster and doing some low flying. Apparently there was a bit of a game in progress with the jeep going around the bush, perhaps ducking into the bush to hide and the airplane trying to catch it. For those who have never flown an Auster, the pilot is sitting on a seat over the gas tank which is on the floor. It is possible in that position to fly much lower to the ground that it was in an L19.

The story at that time was that the aircraft came around one side of the bush as the jeep was approaching from the other side. The plane was in a steep turn and the wing tip, missing the windshield, took both occupants out of the jeep. Col Bailey was struck on the head and had serious injuries. The injuries to Capt Hemiingson were apparently less severe. Col Bailey was away from work for a considerable period of time”.

Another version often related through the haze of a beer or two was that Col Bailey was standing on the seat of his jeep on a hilltop (for Shilo – read mound). According to this story, the Commandant was berating Gord Shellard for not flying low enough. Gord’s pass over the jeep where he dinged Col Bailey was obviously low enough. There is no mention of damage to the jeep.

The upshot of this story is to try to determine what really happened. If anyone has more empirical knowledge of the caper, please let us know. We believe this is the only time one of our pilots contacted, in flight, an object other than a tree, fence, antenna, telephone lines or RC signals’ cables.

LCol A. Victor Coroy
Chairman
Canadian Army Aviation Website


Added: December 19, 2017
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
Hi,

Interesting piece of correspondence from a former aviator and Surgeon General of the CF,MGen (ret'd) Bob Fassold. I sent him a bit of information I found on the RCAF bulletin on the Canadian Army Aviation website as I thought he might be interested and sure enough!!!
I am forwarding the note he sent to me as I think it might be of interest to you and for tour Website which by the way is really well done. Congratulations are in order.

Denis Pilote. Major (ret'd)

Forwarded message from Bob Fassold:

Denis,

When I became a charter member of the new Air Command and moved to Winnipeg in 1975, I had just recently completed helicopter conversion training at Portage. I ran into Jimmy Pugh, a former quite famous Canadian Army helicopter pilot, but then just posted to ACHQ and we did helicopter flying together a lot 75-78 until I went to DCIEM. In fact we developed and established (by flying experimentation) helicopter approaches for all the then Winnipeg old and new hospitals, the first time Transport Canada had such. In fact Sherri and I became close friends with him and his wife Helen and remained so for a number of years, but after Jim retired they spent most of their time traveling and we completely lost touch.

Just a few weeks ago I discovered by the link below tat Jim died 8 Jun 2014, attended by Helen. I don't have any coordinates for her or know of anyone who might, but if you contact the involved funeral home they might be able to dig one up for you. Helen herself might still be OK and remember me, but anyway you might better be able to contact someone else in the family who could provide some very worthwhile historical info on Army Aviation, and be happy to do so, as you can gather from the obit they were rightly very proud of Jimmy. I was honored to have him as such a close friend, and I learned so much hands-on from him about real operational helicopter flying that I regularly impressed the twin Huey instructors on my annual refresher course at Gagetown!

http://passages.winnipegfreepress.com/passage-details/id-214515/ PUGH_JAMES

Cheers,
Bob


Added: October 12, 2017
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address




Comments:
All Pilots,

If you visited the website recently you will notice several changes and additions to our history. The changes are in keeping with making the website as progressive and interesting as possible. The site is attracting other members of the military and aviation buffs from the public. It appears that we are meeting our objective of telling the story of Army aviation.

What have we done? A visit to the website will show amongst other things, the following items:

An updated “Home” screen, a dedication to Bob Heitshu, several new articles including a well research paper contributed by LCol (Ret’d) Dean Black, Editor of Air Force Magazine, a very interesting account by Joe Oakley about an event in a C45, an account by Robin Hellar-Symonds from the UK, and a updated Memoriam section where John Dicker and John Heitshu are managing the listing of all our pilots who have taken the Last Flight.

With the passing of Bob Heitshu, we have reorganized our editorial board to continue managing the site. Yours truly is now Chairman of the Board with John Dicker as website Coordinator, Doc Hopper is our research Director and John Heitshu remains as our very capable website manager.

We still need your aviation story(ies) or biography (as it pertains to army flying), photos and any videos you might have. They all add to a great Canadian military story and history which few know about. Help us complete the picture as best we can.

A reminder, if you haven’t had your log book archived or you possess one from one of our pilots who has taken his Last Flight, our 150th Anniversary project is still underway. The details for archiving a log book at the Canadian Air and Space Museum are on the website. The bottom line is – get on with it, time is a wasting!

Finally, we enjoy hearing from you and we take your comments to heart. Keep the cards, letters and emails coming.

Yours truly,

Vic Coroy
Chairman, Website Editorial Board
Canadian Army Aviation Website


Added: July 30, 2017
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address




Comments:
All Pilots,

Regret to notify all that Maj (Ret'd) EHP (Pierre) Garneau RCAC passed-away in YOW 12 Jul 17 at the age of 94. Pierre was a student on No.1 AirOP and Liaison Pilot Course, graduating in Mar 49. This course was run by 444 AirOP Sqn (RCAF) at Rivers. The Sqn was later re-designated as the Light Aircraft School (LAS) 1 Apr 49. Fellow students on that course were Fred Wagner, Bill Hall, Rudy Ulrich and Dave Struthers. Further details on Pierre can be found in a previous post to this website dated 18 Nov 15 in both the "New" and "CJATC/AATTS" sections, entitled "Canadian Army Aviation Memories" authored by LCol(Ret'd) John Dicker. Pierre was the epitome of an officer and gentleman and his loss to the Canadian Army Aviator Band of Brothers is indeed most significant.

Our sincere condolences go out to the Garneau family on this very sad occasion.

John Dicker LCol(Ret'd)
Co-ordinator Canadian Army Aviation website


Added: July 19, 2017
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address




Comments:
All Pilots,

Sadly I must report that, BGen (Ret'd) Bob Heitshu took his last flight at 2300 Friday evening (2 June 17), His wife Wendy and his family were at his side. Tentative plans are for a family funeral before a reception at Beechwood Cemetery in Ottawa.

Bob will be remembered not only as a distinguished Gunner officer but also his service as an Air OP pilot with 1 Air OP Flight, Camp Petawawa. Bob also served as the long standing Chairman of the Canadian Air OP Association until it was stood down. Latterly, he was instrumental in establishing the Canadian Army Aviation website and served as the Editorial Committee Chairman. BGen Bob Heitshu was a staunch supporter of all things related to army aviation and was determined that our history would not disappear. We will miss a great comrade along with his guidance and leadership.

Our sincere condolences go out to Wendy and his family.

Vic Coroy
Coordinator
Canadian Army Aviation Website


Added: June 7, 2017
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address




Comments:
All Pilots,

Sadly I relay the message that Bill Pollock has taken his last flight yesterday evening. When I receive more details, I will pass them on to you. Many of us who had the privilege of knowing Bill enjoyed an association with him as a friend, comrade, exceptional army and CF pilot, and a helicopter instructor to name a few hallmarks of his legacy as a gunner officer and pilot.

Our sincere sympathy to Marg and Bill's family

Vic Coroy
Coordinator
Canadian Army Aviation Website


Added: May 21, 2017
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address
Powered by PHP Guestbook - brought to you by PHP Scripts
 
1 2 3 4 5 Next › Last »