Canadian Army Aviation Forum





Comments:
Really nice to see my dad's pictures and his name mentioned several times, him being a pilot with jets, planes and helicopters. He flew until the age of 75 mostly as a flight instructor, helicopters. My dad was retired Major Nick Mulikow.

Added: January 17, 2017
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With reference to a comment I submitted 12 Aug 16 pertaining to the Wartime Section of the website and a request for further identification (first name and Wartime sqn) of some of the Wartime Air OP pilots documented in that section, no reply of an sort, from anyone, has been received as of this date. Either there has been no visitors to the site since my comment was posted or there is absolutely no-one on this side of the sod who has ever known any of the individuals identified well enough to provide the information requested. I ask once again for any visitors to the site to try and recollect the individuals in question and provide me with whatever they can by way of first name and/or sqn. Even an "educated guess" would be of value. Your help would be greatly appreciated as time is surely not on our side. Cheers. JohnD

Added: November 4, 2016
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Good Morning Sir,

My name is Norman Belyea MWO (Ret'd) and I would like to thank you and the others for the hard work in compiling lists ans stories of our times in the AOP, it was a great part of my career. I served as a new Gunner to the Regiment in Gagetown from May 1965 to July/Aug 1966 with my best friend Gnr Roger Mailman (now deceased) who I also noticed was not on the list. We were both fresh still wet behind the ears graduates of the Gunner Apprentice Program, men like Sgt Garron and lots of others whose names escape me mow made sure we kept on the straight and narrow, safe and out of trouble most of the time. I even got to do a fly over to Germany with AOP during my time there. A couple of the pilots at that time I remember flying with were Capt's Gerry Gower and Freddy Ayers, that was also the time when when we were involved with tests on the Huey Choppers. t was a great time to serve: I did 28 years, 12 in the Artillery and the rest in the RCEME.

Hi Vic,

Thanks for the reply. Gnr Roger Mailman and I arrived at AOP Troop in May of 1965 and I was posted back to Shilo from the Troop in Aug 1966, I believe Roger may have stayed another year but not sure. As far as what Roger and I did during that time, we were new gunners to the unit with lots of trade courses from the Apprentice Training Battery but little experience, we did a lot of general duties, guard and kitchen duties and clean up stores, driving the unit vehicles, signaller, set up, tear down and clean p from exercises, fire picket, generator duties and most important and enjoyable, Air Observer duties for Recce and fire missions. When we first arrived we thought the pilots were all crazy as they were always trying to scare us and the other pilots while we were flying and sometimes succeeded with the $75.00 ride with the stall at about 6-7 thousand feet, the old pilot heart condition, pill in the left breast pocket trick, flying too low towards bushes and pull up at the last minute and adjust the carb mixture and tell us something was wrong with the engine and get prepared, we may have to bail out. We learned quickly and became pretty good at reading them. One flight in Germany on the 65 or 66 fly over we did run into trouble and landed in a potato field near power lines, the ground crew came out and made a fix to the aircraft but we had to strip it of unnecessary weight including me and push the L19 to help it get airborne, it looked like he would hit some trees at the end of the field but he made it. Another time we were flying back to fort Prince of Wales, the pilot spied a young German couple skipping across a hay field hand in hand and started buzzing them getting closer each time, they were scared and so was I, thought we were going to jail but nothing ever happened that I know of.

In camp Gagetown we spent a lot of time detached on exercise at Camp Petersville supporting flying operations. One time the whole AOP Troop went on exercise around the province of NB and used small remote airstrips to bivouac and land the planes, we did guard/fire picket duties each night to make sure no locals came calling after hours. One night I had the graveyard shift, was woken up by the guy before me but I fell back to sleep, I woke up with a start shortly after 0500 hrs, checked that everything was secure, lit the immersion heaters and woke everyone up for breakfast, I knew I was in deep * * * so being a good gunner I needed a good story why I didn't wake the next guy on shift, I said I had a bad stomach ache all night so I stayed up and continued my shift, Sgt Garron didn't buy that for a minute, he knew it was BS nd said so, in the end I got off easy with some more duties.

It was a great time with great people and I wouldn't have missed it for the world. Good luck with your Forum.

Thanks for the memories, take care.

Cheers,

Norm Belyea
UBIQUE


Added: October 17, 2016
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Some sad news to relate. I was just notified yesterday by Nan Maione, Peter's wife, that Peter passed-away 28 Jul 2016 in Langley BC. I have no other details other than to say that there is a Book of Remembrance on a Langley BC Obit website, if you are so inclined to search for it on Google. Peter was on my Pilot Course (CE PFS 62/1 and LAPC 34, graduating Apr 63). He was a fine officer and gentleman and truly a 'character' in many respects as anyone who knew him will attest He will be missed and not soon forgotten. Sadly, JohnD

Added: September 7, 2016
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Any visitors to the site viewing the recently re-constituted Wartime Section who might know the first name and/or sqn of the following Wartime Air OP officers are asked to contact me: Capt FAH Carberry (first name only), Capt R Everett (first name only), Capt DG Gibson (first name only), Capt JC Hay (first name only), Capt RE Russell (first name only), Capt RJ Waldie (first name and sqn), Capt WG Wood (first name and sqn) and Capt JVW Robinson (sqn only). With many thanks. JohnD

Added: August 12, 2016
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Picked-up a very interesting copy of a book (soft-covered, 108 pgs), at a Militaria Show here in Ottawa recently, entitled "Jump Wings-History of Canadian Airborne Qualification Badges 1942-2012". It is authored by Ken Joyce and published by Service Publications in Ottawa in Aug 2015. It is a very well-researched book IMO and of particular interest was a chapter on the Army Flying Badge.I believe the book is available through the publisher at sales@servicepub.com. I would also like to strongly recommend Mr. Joyce's website "Airborne History Canada" for anyone interested in Canadian Airborne Operations.

Added: May 8, 2016
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All Pilots,

For those who have taken the opportunity to visit our Canadian Army Aviation website will find that it is maturing. A number of updates and new items are posted or being reviewed for posting. The "work in progress" is starting to gather momentum and will show up on the site in time.

One area of army flying that needs to be addressed is in individual experiences or better still a biographical overview of flying careers. Many had unusual experiences outside of the main stream army units (Air OP, Recce, transport, liaison etc.). Some of you were seconded or posted to other CAF flying units and others to foreign units. We need to capture your story in this regard. The Editorial Board appreciates that most of us are somewhat reluctant or too busy to tell our story. Swallow your pride and take some time to add to our history! Your submissions will be edited to give the flavour of an interview and it will be posted using the third person. We will also ensure edited submissions get the approval of those who submitted them before being posted. Please consider having photos to accompany your submission, it is always interesting for visitors to the website to actually see the person(s) and the aircraft/equipment/clothing of the perioud.

One final note, does anyone have any recollection whatsoever of a Rowlandson G. RCA, who is listed on page 173 of Canada's Flying Gunners, as a "Gunner pilot"? John Dicker and Joe Oakley are unable to sleep trying to track down who this chap was so that they can complete the listings of army pilots. The question is either the list in the history (Canada's Flying Gunners) is an error or he did exist at sometime as an army pilot. Let John, Joe or me know if you have any information about this person.

Regards to all,

Vic Coroy
Coordinator
Canadian Army Aviation Website


Added: May 7, 2016
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Comments:
Any old farts going to attend the 75th of 403 Sqn? If my plans work out, I will be in Fredericton enroute to Les Iles de la Madeleine around the time of their festivities.

Added: April 12, 2016
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Comments:
Fred,

In my view you are certainly an army pilot and I know from first hand a dedicated RCASC pilot. You may be over-qualified being trained in Air OP operations by Nick Mulikow. Thanks for the comment.

Vic
Website Coord


Added: April 7, 2016
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At times not sure if I am still considered an army pilot by you guys. I'm not a "Gunner' but a proud RCASC and air force pilot, but not RCAF.

I was checked out on L19s after getting my wings with the US Army, and I noted after four hours on type, what next? The truth is that earlier we were not really considered "qualified" pilots. Lorne Rodenbush flew our Canadian army pilot wings to us in Fort Rucker for the wings parade arriving at the eleventh hour. Up to the last minute we were not considered qualified by Canadian standards even though the US Army was presenting us with wings, but only to fly helicopters.

The British Army Air Corps instructed and qualified me as Air OP pilot. I really learned how to do the job from Nick Mulikow when I was CO of 403 Squadron. Nick was one of my instructor pilots (What a superb pilot and Gunner). I was then qualified to teach Air OP procedures (on helicopters obviously} and eventually forward air controlling.

I'm not gripping but just trying to provide you with some history of my own flying experience as an RCASC army pilot, the blue wings are my most proud possession.

Yours,

Fred Zeggil


Added: April 7, 2016
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